A Potpourri of Khorjin (Saddlebags) by Bob Emry, Part 2

This is Part 2 of a virtual version of a Rug and Textile Appreciation Morning program by Bob Emry, on complete khorjin sets.  If you have not read Part 1, you can reach it using this link.

https://rjohnhowe.wordpress.com/2014/09/26/a-potpourri-of-khorjin-saddlebags-by-bob-emry-part-1/

 

Bob1

Members of the audience had brought in a lot of material and Bob treated it next.

We will jump around, geographically a bit more because the pieces were in a large pile on a side table.

The first of these  was a Baluch “packing bag” with lots of side tassels with shells.  Loops closure system.

K41

K42

The next piece was a Shahsavan sumak piece from the Kamseh district. Good color.  Its stepped polygons are a frequent Shahsavan design usage.

K42

K43Next was half khorjin with Turkman-like designs.

K43

K44

The following piece was a complete Baluch khorjin.  Vertically striped field.  Slit and loop closure system but missing the loops.

K44

K45

Here is the back.

K45b

I have only a very fuzzy image of the front of the next piece, a smaller khorjin.

K44

K46a

I do not have an attribution for it, but its interesting back, below, suggests maybe SW Persia.

K46

Next was another fuzzy image of a complete Anatolian heybe.

K45

K47fuzzy

I can do better on the detail images of K45.  Here is one of its faces.  This piece is from southeast Turkey.  No closure system.

K47a

Notice the typical long slit in the connecting panel.

K47b

Here is a full look at its back.

K47c

With the next piece we moved to smaller bags.  Qashqa’i.  (There are going to be some more fuzzy images now because pieces were being moved very quickly in order to cover the large number to be treated.)

K46

K48front

Here is its back.

K48back

Another small piece was

K46

K49frontfuzzy

Here is a better image of one of its front faces.  Qashqa’i.  Slits and large loops closure system.

K49frontdetailHere is its back.  Loops woven in.

K49back

The next complete khorjin was from Karabagh in the Caucasus.  Bold cruciform medallion and over-size border devices.  Sumak technique.

K47

K50

No visible closure system.

K50b

The next piece was also from the Caucasus.  Plain woven back with stripes.  Two sets of loops with an interlacing cord.  Probably Azeri. 

K48

K51

The next piece was Luri or Bakhtiari.  Sumak.  A great deal of white (cotton?).  Hair selvedges.  Pile at “bottoms” of the bags.

K49

K52

A peek at its plain-weave striped back.

K52b

The next piece was Veramin.  Slit and loop closure system.  Black and white loops

K50

K53

K53b

Here is the back.  Loops woven in.

K53c

The next piece was  a complete Jaff Kurd set.  Bob noted that this khorjin has had the side seams taken out at some point in its history and was then re-assembled.  Like the Jaff khorjin shown earlier, this one also has just a single row of closure loops, and as here, re-assembled, neither row of closure slots reaches to the loops.  It should have been assembled so that the pile “elem” panels that show here on the back were showing on the front instead–then both rows of closure slots would be opposite the row of closure loops.

K51

K54The back. Notice two sewn-in blue beads.

K54e

The next piece was a leather-reinforced, pile Anatolian heybe.  The usual long slit.  Pile heybes are rare-ish.

K52

K55

A detail of its  back.

K55c

The next piece was Shahsavan sumak from the Kamseh District.

K53

K56

The next piece was Armenian.  Its  medallions are a version of the center of the “eagle Kazak” device.  Weaver did not weave “animals” upside down on one of the face panels so that they would both be oriented right side up when hung over the short connecting panel.

K54

K57bestoverall

Bottom bag face is inscribed in an Armenian script above and in the medallion.

The next piece is a pile heybe face from western Anatolia.  The design is one of the most frequent seen on heybes from this area.

K55

K58

The next piece was complete and Kurdish.

K56

K59overallfronta

It has slits and loops but the loops are mostly hidden in these images.  An unusual feature is a pair of pile squares at the sides of the mid-point of the connecting panel.

K59a

Here is a detail of its back.

K59b

The next piece was was smaller, complete Afshar.  Its field is taken over by over-sized rose forms.  This design is European, but was adopted by weavers in the Caucasus and areas of Persia and Turkey.  The design is called “cabbbage rose,” or “gul farang,” in the literature.

A colorful, chevroned-faced, slit and loop closure system.  Two seemingly ad hoc slits at the ends of the yellow-dark bounded central marker of the connecting panel.  These slits are woven-in –the sides of the slits have selvage finish.

K57

K60

Here is the back.

K60b

The next piece was Kurdish, with a bold eight-pointed star.

K58

K61

Detail of front face.

K61c

Here are two images of its back.

K61dmaybe

K61e

The next piece was another complete, leather-reinforced Anatolian heybe.  This time from southwest Anatolia.  Weave on the faces is brocade.  Owner said some dyes seem synthetic, but that there has been no color transfer to white areas despite lots of opportunity.  Leather is modestly embossed.  Said to have been woven in the Fithye area of southeast Turkey.

K60

K62

Here is the back with an unusual red, yellow, ivory, brown, bright blue striping.  Tufts of bright tassels sewn on, likely to distract the “evil eye.”

K62b

The next piece was Shahsavan khorjin set in which the two bags have been cut apart.  Very good color with an unusual red and white striped ground.  The field devices are also more articulated than are some similar Shahsavan pices

K61

K63

K64

Here is the back of the first one above.

K63a

And here is the back of the second one.

K64a

The next piece was southwest Persia, probably Luri.  Red wefts.  Stepped central medallion with hooks.  Brocaded back.

K62

 k65

The next piece was done in zili. Caucasian or NW Persian.  Probably either a chuval or part of a mafrash cargo bag.

K63

K66

The next piece was maybe Qashqa’i.  Central diamond medallion, hooked but not stepped.

K64

K67

The next piece was most of a khorjin half.  Bakhtiari.  Birds in compartment at the bottom of the face, but before the striped back.

K64

K68

K68a

The next piece was similar.  Bakhtiari.  Sumak and plain weave striped area on back.  Zig-zag field design on back.

K65

K69

The next piece was southwest Persian.  Small medallion tiled field design, with each tile sharing  one quarter to form another set of bi-colored tiles.  Slit and loop closure system.

K66

K71better

The next piece was Veramin.  Eight-pointed stars in border.  Stepped cruciform field devices.

K67

K72

The next piece was probably Uzbek with concentric, stepped field designs.  Vertical side borders resemble NE Persian sofreh usages.  Loops visible for closure system.  Interlocking tapestry weave.

K68

K73

The next piece was also probably Uzbek.  Diamond field design resembles those seen in Jaff Kurd and flat-woven Kordi pieces, the latter, from NE Iran.  These pieces tend to be surprisingly fine.  No closure system.

K69

K74

The next piece was probably Turkmen.  The closure system is two rows of loops, sewn-on, identical to those of the Turkmen khorjins seen earlier.  The face design in extra-weft is similar to other flat-woven Turkmen torbas , but not often seen in a bag this small.

K70

K75

The next piece was an unusual, complete khorjin.  Warp-faced.  Woven as a long strip of this technique.  Seemingly done entirely in natural colored brown and white wool, with only traces of dyed wool in the wrapped selveges.  No closure system.

K71

K76

The next piece was Bakhtiari done in sumak.

K72

K77

Typical pile at the bag folds.

K77d


Slit and loop closure system with loops woven in and nicely decorated slit panels.

K77e

Back has another frequent Bakhtiari usage: plain weave stripes with white-ground sumak panels.

K77f

K77g

K77h

The next piece was possibly Qashqa’i.  Brocaded with decorative tufts.  Slit and loops closure system.

K73

K78

Back is brocaded in a similar way.

K78d

Bob answered questions and brought his session to a close.

Bob5answeringquestions

The after-session conversations and examination of the material began.

After5

After2

After4

After3

After1

I want to thank Bob Emry for this well-conceived program, for his permission to fashion this virtual version of it, and for some after-session photos, he took, and for his considerable editing assistance.

Thanks also to Wendel Swan for some useful images he provided.

I hope you have enjoyed this interesting, well-conceived, program.

R.  John Howe

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